Big Ag Fights Back, Michigan Turns Small Farmers into Felons - Walden Labs

Solutions for Self-Reliance

Big Ag Fights Back, Michigan Turns Small Farmers into Felons

SHARE
,

Hey folks.  Building a resilient community that provides a high quality of life for us, our families, and our neighbors — no matter what the future throws at us — isn’t going to be a cakewalk.

It’s going to be tough.  In many instances it will be hotly resisted by the global, corrupt, industrial mess currently leading us into economic, social and environmental oblivion.

How will they attempt to slow us down?  They will cheat, mainly by pressuring an increasingly corrupt government to turn the local production of food, energy, water and products into a crime.

Here’s an example of this cheating in action.  An example of how a part of “Big Ag” shut down local farms that threatened their control over the pork market.

They made raising heritage pigs (pigs that have long hair like the ones below) in Michigan a crime (!).

To really understand what happened, I did a little forensic research.  Here’s what I found out;

  1. Owners of wild game preserves imported feral hogs for their customers to hunt on their private property.
  2. Some of the feral hogs got loose and began to run wild.  This started a scare about a feral swine pandemic.  Combined with some local stories about feral swine destroying crops and threatening livestock, the government was put under pressure to take action.
  3. The government moved to make feral swine illegal in the state.  In normal circumstances, that would mean that wild pigs would be professionally hunted.  That didn’t happen in this case.
  4. It’s likely at this point that the pork industry decided to make its move against the rapidly growing market for local, heirloom pork.  What did they do?  They lobbied to make the test for being identified as a “feral pig” into a profile rather than the act of running wild.  Under the wording of the law, any pig that had long hair, a straight tail, etc. would now classified as feral “invasive species,” even if they lived on a farm.
  5. The immediate result.  Surveillance and raids on farms.  The mass slaughter of farmed livestock.  What’s even fishier is that Michigan’s Department of Resources (DNR), operating well outside of their traditional jurisdiction over hunting and fishing, was the agency tapped to raid the farms.

For more, read the story the US Air Force veteran Mark Baker, and his fight to protect his farm.  He’s even put out a video.

As the old system winds down in the US and EU, and we start to move towards more and more resilient production, we are going to see MANY more attempts by big industries to rig the legal system to slow us down.  Their business is to keep us dependent.

Get ready.

Your willing to join you on this fight analyst,

 

JOHN ROBB

 

PS:  One way to fight back?  Participate in legal defense funds that defend local production.  It’s a good way to fight a rearguard action while we pull away from the mess.  Here’s one for local food producers called “The Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund.”  They have some good coverage of this incident.

PPS:  A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a letter on how a backyard farm, repletewith a chicken coop, has become aspirational (the type of product, like a Ferrari, that you aspire to have someday….).   Here’s more evidence.  Williams-Sonoma, the upscale retailer, now has a backyard farming line.

Williams-Sonoma Chicken Tractor

 

 

Want more like this?

This is just one aspect of self-reliance. You'll find more in our 100% free online Self-Reliance Catalog, a carefully curated collection of the best in self-reliance & resilience

The goal of The Self-Reliance Catalog is to help you know better what is worth getting and where and how to do the getting, whether that “thing” is a plant, a tool, a book, or even a design for a home or greenhouse.

Set up your free account here for instant access

Comments

comments

Suggested Videos

Self-Reliance is Hard
We Make It Easier

Solutions for Smarter Self-Reliance:

You'll find them in The Self-Reliance Catalog; a carefully curated collection of the best plants, tools, shelters and systems for self-reliance and resilience.

Free Registration